Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking

by Michael Ruhlman

ISBN-10: 1416566112
ISBN-13: 9781416566113
Region: USA
Publisher: Scribner
Publication Date: April, 2009
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Recipe Index

Recipesort icon Page Rating
1-2-3- Cookie Dough: The Essence-of-a-Cookie Cookie 38
0
3-2-1 Pie Dough (Pâte Brisée) 25
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Addison’s Bebop-a-Rebop Rhubarb Pie with Lattice Crust 30
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Agnolotti with an Herbed Chicken Stuffing 148
0
All-Beef Sausage 136
0
Angel Food Cake 66
0
Any-Fruit Fruit Tart 29
0
Apple Fritters 76
0
Banana Bread 72
0
Basic (but amazing) Popovers 76
0
Basic Bread Dough 9
0
Basic Brine 154
0
Basic Caramel Sauce 223
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Basic Crepes, for Savory or Sweet Filling 82
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Basic Fritter Batter 74
0
Basic Ganache 221
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Basic Mayonnaise: An exceptionally versatile suace 170
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Basic Mousseline Forcemeat 144
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Basic Pancake Batter 72
0
Basic Pasta Dough 17
0
Basic Pâte à Choux 47
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Basic Quick Bread/Muffin Batter 71
0
Bear Batter Fritters 75
0
Beef Stock 96
0
Berry Tart 29
0
Blueberry-Custard Tart 29
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Boudin Blanc 150
0
Breakfast Sausage 136
0
Canadian Bacon 158
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Caramel-Chocolate Tart 28
0
Caramelized Onion and Comté Tart 27
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Chicago Biscuits (3-2-1- Biscuits) 34
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Chicken Consommé 107
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Chicken Sausage with Basil and Roasted Red Peppers 138
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Chilli-Lime Mayonnaise 173
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Chimichurri Sauce 182
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Chipotle-Cilantro Butter Sauce 192
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Chocolate and Vanilla Tart 28
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Chocolate Cherry Bread 12
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Citrus Vinaigrette 180
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Classic Chocolate Chip Cookies 43
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Classic Crème Caramel 200
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Classic Hollandaise Sauce 189
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Classic Red Wine Vinaigrette 179
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Classic Sugar Cookies 44
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Consommé using and Stock 106
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Cooked Gnocchi: Basil, Tomatos, and Garlic
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Cooked Gnocchi: Butternut Squash, Sage, and Brown Butter 51
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Cooked Gnocchi: Chicken and Dumplings! 50
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Cooked Gnocchi: Clams, White Wine, Garlic, and Thyme 51
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Cooked Gnocchi: Corn, Bacon, and Fava Beans 50
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Cooked Gnocchi: Mushrooms, Shallot, and Spinach 51
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Cooked Gnocchi: Ramps and Roasted Peppers 50
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Corn-Tortilla Soup 104
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Corned Beef 159
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Cream Soups using any Green Vegetable 117
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Cream Soups using any nongreen Vegetable 118
0
Crème Anglaise 211
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Crème Brûlée 214
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Crème Pâtissière 215
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Curried Mayonnaise 174
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Curried Pea and Onion Fritters 75
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Curried Yellow Split Pea Soup 105
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Duck or Turkey Sausage 136
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Dutch Oven Method 13
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Everyday Chicken Stock 93
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Fish Fumet 98
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Fish Stock 97
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Flat Bread with Thyme, Olive Oil, and Kosher Salt 13
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For Brown Veal Stock 96
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For White Veal Stock 96
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Fresh Bratwurst 139
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Fried Garlic Bread 13
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Gnocchi à la Romaine 51
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Gougères 48
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Green Curry Soup with Beef 105
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Grilled Focaccia 12
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Hot Italian Sausage 136
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Instant Mayonnaise 175
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Jalapeño and Corn Focaccia 12
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Lamb Sausage with Olives and Citrus 137
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Lemon Tart 28
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Lemon-Poppy Seed Cookies 41
0
Lemon-Poppy Seed Muffins 72
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Lemon-Shallot Mayonnaise 172
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Lime-Peanut Vinaigrette 183
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Mayonnaise with Fines Herbes 174
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Mexican Chorizo 136
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Nut Vinaigrette (Walnut) 181
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Old Fashioned Butterscotch Sauce 224
0
Old-Fashioned Pound Cake (Creaming Method) 61
0
Olive-Walnut Bread 11
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Onion Ciabatta 12
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Orange-Ginger Chocolate Truffles 222
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Parisienne Gnocchi 49
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Pasta Verde (Green Pasta) 20
0
Pâte Sucrée 26
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Peach and Prosciutto Tart 28
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Peach Fritters 76
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Pizza Dough 13
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Potato and Leek Tart 28
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Profiteroles with Hot Chocolate Sauce 216
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Profiteroles, Cream Puffs, and Éclairs 48
0
Quatre Épices 151
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Quiche Lorraine 201
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Quick Bread and Muffins: Apple-Cinnamon 72
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Quick Bread and Muffins: Blueberry 72
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Quick Bread and Muffins: Cranberry Orange 72
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Red Wine and Rosemary Sauce 193
0
Rich Egg Yolk Pasta 21
0
Rip’s Spice Cookies 42
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Roasted Chicken with Lemon and Herb Brine with Perfect How-to-Cook-Green-Beans Green Beans 156
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Roasted Chicken with Sauce Fines Herbes: A lesson in using Slurry or Beurre Manié 123
0
Rosemary and Roasted Garlic Bread 12
0
Rum-Cardamom Chocolate Sauce 222
0
Sage and Brown Butter Bread 12
0
Salt Cod Fritters 76
0
Sauce Béarnaise 190
0
Sautéed Leek and Walnut Tart 27
0
Shrimp and Scallop Sausage 147
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Shrimp Dumplings 146
0
Spicy Corn Fritters 75
0
Spicy Garlic Sausage 135
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Sponge Cake (Foaming Method) 63
0
Sweet Italian Sausage 136
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Tempura Batter 78
0
The Best Banana Split Ever 225
0
Toffee 226
0
Tomato Tart 28
0
Traditional Chicken Stock 94
0
Vanilla Ice Cream with Maker’s Mark 213
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Veal Stock 95
0
Vegetable Soup 105
0
Vegetable Stock 98
0
Venison Sausage 136
0
Warm Tomato Vinaigrette 183
0
White Bean, Sausage, and Escarole Soup 104
0
White Sandwich Bread 13
0
Zucchini Fritters 75
0

Publishers Information

About Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking

Publisher Web Link: http://books.simonandschuster.com/

WHEN YOU KNOW A CULINARY RATIO, IT’S NOT LIKE KNOWING A SINGLE RECIPE, IT’S INSTANTLY KNOWING A THOUSAND.

Why spend time sorting through the millions of cookie recipes available in books, magazines, and on the Internet? Isn’t it easier just to remember 1-2-3? That’s the ratio of ingredients that always make a basic, delicious cookie dough: 1 part sugar, 2 parts fat, and 3 parts flour. From there, add anything you want -- chocolate, lemon and orange zest, nuts, poppy seeds, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, almond extract, or peanut butter, to name a few favorite additions. Replace white sugar with brown for a darker, chewier cookie. Add baking powder and/or eggs for a lighter, airier texture.

RATIOS ARE THE STARTING POINT FROM WHICH A THOUSAND VARIATIONS BEGIN.

Ratios are the simple proportions of one ingredient to another. Biscuit dough is 3 : 1 : 2 -- or 3 parts flour, 1 part fat, and 2 parts liquid. This ratio is the beginning of many variations, and because the biscuit takes sweet and savory flavors with equal grace, you can top it with whipped cream and strawberries or sausage gravy. Vinaigrette is 3 : 1, or 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar, and is one of the most useful sauces imaginable, giving everything from grilled meats and fish to steamed vegetables or lettuces intense flavor.

Cooking with ratios will unchain you from recipes and set you free. With thirty-three ratios and suggestions for enticing variations, Ratio is the truth ofcooking: basic preparations that teach us how the fundamental ingredients of the kitchen -- water, flour, butter and oils, milk and cream, and eggs -- work. Change the ratio and bread dough becomes pasta dough, cakes become muffins become popovers become crepes.

As the culinary world fills up with overly complicated recipes and never-ending ingredient lists, Michael Ruhlman blasts through the surplus of information and delivers this innovative, straightforward book that cuts to the core of cooking. Ratio provides one of the greatest kitchen lessons there is -- and it makes the cooking easier and more satisfying than ever. (http://books.simonandschuster.com/)

Author Information

About Michael Ruhlman

Author Web Link: http://ruhlman.com/

The best things in life happen when you get carried away. I went into a cooking school to write about what it means to be a chef, and instead I became a cook, got a job line cooking, lucked into one of the great restaurants of the world to work with the chef on his book, and I kept on writing about food. I got carried away, and it’s made all the difference.

The facts are these: Born 1963 in Cleveland, graduated Duke in 1985 with a BA in literature, worked at The New York Times as a copyboy where I managed to slip some stories into most sections of the paper, departed after fewer than two years to pursue a desultory life of writing, travel and odd jobs, returning to Cleveland with my wife, Donna, a newspaper and magazine photographer, in 1991. Found work at a local magazine covering arts and cultural scene and here began writing about chefs and cooking.

My first book, Boys Themselves (1996), revealed life at an all-boy day school that was defiantly all-boys at a time when anything all-boys was considered toxic and anything all-girls was great for girls.

A committed cook since fourth grade, I proposed to the Culinary Institute of America, the oldest and most influential professional cooking school in the country, that I be allowed into its kitchen classrooms in order to write a narrative of how the school trains professional chefs. The school agreed, and I wrote The Making of a Chef (1997), rereleased in 2009 in a new paperback edition.

I became so fascinated by the work of the professional cook and the culture of the restaurant kitchen that I continued to pursue the work and wrote a book about chefs and cooking, The Soul of a Chef (2000). I co-wrote The French Laundry Cookbook (1999) with Thomas Keller at the same time, and he and I subsequently wrote a food column for the Los Angeles Times for two years.

In February 1999, I moved with my family to Martha’s Vineyard to research and report on life at a yard making plank-on-frame boats for the book Wooden Boats: In Pursuit of the Perfect Craft at an American Boatyard (2001). In October 2000, I began work at the Cleveland Clinic’s Children’s Hospital for the book Walk on Water (2003). I wrote it concurrently with A Return to Cooking (2002), with Eric Ripert, chef-owner of Le Bernardin, the Manhattan four-star restaurant.

Other books include House: A Memoir, about the purchase and renovation of a 1901 house in Cleveland and an exploration of the nature of home in our vagabond culture, and The Reach of a Chef: Professional Cooks in the Age of Celebrity. Other cookbooks include Bouchon, written with Keller and the others from the French Laundry Cookbook team, about French comfort food, and Under Pressure, the first American cookbook to explore the possibilities of sous vide cooking. I was a contributor to the Alinea, Grant Achatz’s tour de force on the new new cuisine. I wrote Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking and Curing–a thinly veiled love song to the pig, to animal fat and salt, sausages, confits, pates, terrines–with my friend, the Michigan chef Brian Polcyn.

I have been on several television shows, “Cooking Under Fire” on PBS, and, on the Food Network, I was a judge on the “Next Iron Chef,” appear occasionally as a judge on “Iron Chef America,” and have been a featured guest on the Travel Channel’s “Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations,” Las Vegas and Cleveland episodes.

In 2007 I published The Elements of Cooking: Translating the Craft for Every Kitchen, “an indispensable compendium of cooking information for both professional and amateur cooks constitutes a precise, unpretentious, unencumbered culinary handbook” (Booklist). I realized one day leaving a food writers symposium that I’d spent so much time in kitchen and so much time with the country’s best chefs that I had a huge amount of knowledge about cooking, information that would be valuable to anyone who cared about cooking, from professional chefs to committed home cooks. Needing a structure for all this information I turned to one of my favorite books about the craft of writing, Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style. The book contains essays on the fundamentals of cooking and a deeply opinionated glossary of important cooking terms we all need to know.

My most recent book is Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking, a book devoted to understanding the relationships between our most basic ingredients and how those relationships form the backbone of the craft of cooking.

This fall two new cookbooks I’ve had a hand in will be published: Thomas Keller: At Home with Ad Hoc, the fourth from this team, and Symon Says: Live to Cook, a cookbook from my friend, fellow Clevelander, Michael Symon, chef-restaurateur (Lola/Lolita) and an Iron Chef Food on Network’s “Iron Chef America.” Donna and I continue to live in Cleveland Heights with our two kids, writing, shooting and cooking.  (http://blog.ruhlman.com/)

Cookbooks by Michael Ruhlman