Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian

by Madhur Jaffrey

ISBN-10: 0517596326
ISBN-13: 9780517596326
Region: India
Publisher: Clarkson Potter
Publication Date: November, 1999
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Recipe Index

Recipesort icon Page Rating
A Cold Ginger-Cardamom Drink with Lemon and Mint 644
0
A Delicious Puree of Mixed Vegetables. Sai Bhaji 308
0
Afghani Sour Cherry Chutney. Turshi Alubalu 659
0
Almond Milk. Lait d’Amande 643
0
American “French” Toast 543
0
An Ancient Indian Drink with Ginger and Cardamom. Panaka 644
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An Indian Salt Mixture 705
0
Anatolian Red Lentil Stew with Wheat Berries and Chickpeas. Eksili Çorba 71
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Aromatic Cuban White Bean and Pumpkin Stew. Potaje de Freijoles Blanco 54
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Artichoke Heart and Fresh Fava Bean Salad. Aginares Me Koukia 612
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Artichoke Hearts with Wine and Coriander Seeds. Tiganites Aginares 130
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Artichokes Stewed with Potatoes 129
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Artichokes with Peas. Carciofi con Piselli 131
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Asparagus Stir-Fried with Ginger and Red Pepper 137
0
Asparagus with Pine Nuts 136
0
Asparagus with Romesco Sauce 136
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Azuki and Whole Mung Beans, Crushed and Sautéed. Chow Ar Ni 10
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Azuki Beans and Rice with Sesame Salt. Sekihan 399
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Baby Bok Choy with Chinese Mushrooms 216
0
Baked Beans with Nigerian Seasonings 57
0
Baked Lima Beans or Large White Beans. Fassoulia Fourno 53
0
Baked Potatoes, the Greek Way. Patata Psiti 277
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Barley Stew 327
5
Barley with Spinach and Shallots 326
0
Basic Asparagus, My Way 134
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Basic Mashed Potatoes 281
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Basic Recipe for Cooked Hulled and Split Mung Beans. Basic Moong Dal 75
0
Basic Recipe for Homemade Yogurt 545
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Basic Recipe for Hulled and Split Pigeon Peas (Arhar or Toovar Dal) 86
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Basic Recipe for Hulled and Split Urad Beans. Basic Urad Dal 113
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Basic Recipe for Plain Chickpea Flour Pancakes. Poora/Pudla 37
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Basic Recipe for Plain Chickpea Flour Pizza. Socca/Farinata 39
0
Basic Red Lentils 60
0
Batter-Fried Okra. Tali Hui Besan Wali Bhindi 255
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Bean Curd Salad or Spread 615
0
Bean Curd Vegeburgers 103
0
Bean Curd with Black Bean Sauce 102
0
Bean Curd with Hot Sauce. La Jiao Chieng Chow Dofu 100
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Bean Curd with Mushrooms. Mo Gu Dofu 100
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Bean Curd with Tomatoes and Cilantro 98
0
Beet and Mushroom Curry. Shorvedar Chukandar Aur Khumbi 142
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Beets with Mint and Yogurt. Chukandar Dahi 141
0
Belgian Endives with Bread Crumbs and Parmesan Cheese 144
0
Bengali-Style Green Beans 207
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Bhutanese Red Rice 377
0
Bitter Melons Stuffed with Onions and Pomegranate Seeds. Bhara Hua Karela 299
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Black Beans with Rice or “Spotted Rooster”. Gallo Pinto 14
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Black Beans “Charros”. Frijoles Charros 13
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Black Tuscan Kale (Cavolo Nero) with Raisins 222
0
Black-Eyed Pea Fritters. Akara 16
0
Black-Eyed Pea Pancakes. Lobhia Ka Cheela 23
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Black-Eyed Pea Sprouts with Garlic and Thyme. Chhoonki Lobhia 24
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Black-Eyed Peas and Rice with Pumpkin 403
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Black-Eyed Peas in a Walnut Sauce 18
0
Black-Eyed Peas with Corn and Dill 19
0
Black-Eyed Peas with Herbs 18
0
Black-Eyed Peas with Swiss Chard. Louvi 20
0
Black-Eyed Peas with Trinidadian Seasonings 21
0
Black-Eyed Peas with Watercress 22
0
Boiled Beets and Beet Greens with a Horseradish Dressing. Pantzarosalata 139
0
Boiled Peanuts, Indonesian Style 121
0
Boiled Vegetable Dumplings. Su Jao Ze 486
0
Bombay-Style Green Mango Pickle. Bumbai Vala Aam Ka Achaar 699
0
Broccoli Rabe Sautéed with Mustard Seeds 219
0
Broccoli Rabe Served on a Bed of Fava Beans 218
0
Broccoli Rabe with Garlic 217
0
Broccoli Rabe with Garlic and Chile Flakes 217
0
Broccoli Stir-Fried with Ginger and Garlic. Chow Chia Lan 146
0
Broccoli with Potatoes 147
0
Broccoli with Spinach. Broccoli Ka Saag 145
0
Broccoli with Walnut Sauce 145
0
Browned Belgian Endives Cooked in Their Own Juices 143
0
Buckwheat Pancakes 330
0
Bulgur Pilaf with Peas and Carrots. Daliya Namkeen 427
0
Bulgur Risotto with Pumpkin 428
0
Bulgur Wheat with Lentils. M’Jaddarat Burgul 425
0
Bulgur Wheat with Red Pepper Paste. Kisir 426
0
Butternut Squash with Sage 288
0
Buttery Soft Slices of Deep-Fried Eggplant with Garlic. Bentinjen M’li 191
0
Cabbage Salad with Mustard Seeds. Bund Gobi Ka Salaad 617
0
Cabbage Salad with Oregano. Curtido 616
0
Cabbage with Garlic and Shallots. Tumis Kol 152
0
Cabbage with Rice and Currants. Tembel Dolma 149
0
Caribbean Seasoning Sauce 675
0
Carrot and Cilantro Salad. Carotte M’chermel 618
0
Carrot “Raita”. Gajar Ka Raita 547
0
Carrots Pickled with Mustard Seeds. Gaajar Ka Achaar 686
0
Carrots with Fresh Fenugreek or Fresh Cilantro. Gajar Methi 159
0
Carrots, Mushrooms, and Onions à La Grecque 156
0
Cashews in a Green Spice Paste 119
0
Cashews in a Mediterranean Tomato Sauce 118
0
Cauliflower and Green Beans in a Red Chile Dressing. Gudangan 164
0
Cauliflower Fritters. Gobi Bhajjia 165
0
Cauliflower Stir-Fried with Ginger and Cilantro 162
0
Cauliflower with Ginger and Cream 162
0
Celery Gratin with Fennel and Black Pepper 167
0
Celery Stir-Fried with Snow Peas 168
0
Chayote with a South Indian Yogurt Sauce. Moru Kootu 553
0
Cheese Pizza 435
0
Chickpea and Chana Dal Cooked Together in a Mint Sauce 34
0
Chickpea and Escarole Soup. Zuppa di Ceci con Escarole 596
0
Chickpea and Potato Curry, Caribbean Style. Potato Chana Curry 33
0
Chickpea Flour Pancakes with Crushed Green Peas and Cilantro 38
0
Chickpea Flour Pancakes with Fresh Green Herbs 38
0
Chickpea Flour Pancakes with Sesame Seeds 38
0
Chickpea Flour Pancakes with Tomato and Onion. Tameta Kanda Na Poora 38
0
Chickpea Flour Pizza with Rosemary, Tomato, and Parmesan Cheese 40
0
Chickpea Flour Pizza With Thyme and Sage 40
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Chickpea Flour ”French Fries”, the Indian Way. Saank 42
0
Chickpea Flour ”French Fries”. Panisses 41
0
Chickpea Soup with Escarole and Dried Porcini Mushrooms. Zuppa de Ceci con Escarole e Porcini Secchi 597
0
Chickpea Soup with Escarole and Tomato 597
0
Chickpea Stew with Six Vegetables 30
0
Chickpeas Cooked in a Moghlai-Style. Moghlai Chanay 32
0
Chickpeas, Pumpkin, and Raisins with Couscous 501
0
Chinese Mixed Vegetable Salad. Hwang Gwa Su Liang Tsai 642
0
Chinese Noodles Sautéed with Vegetables. Su Chow Mein 479
0
Chinese Soy Sauce Salad Dressing. Chiang Yow Tru Chiang 677
0
Chinese “Pickled” Peanuts 123
0
Chinese-Style Scrambled Eggs with Ginger and Bean Curd 530
0
Circassian Sauce-A Walnut and Bread Sauce 684
0
Classic Romesco Sauce 669
0
Coconut and Cilantro Chutney. Nariyal Aur Haray Dhaniay Ki Chutney 663
0
Coconut Chips 661
0
Coconut Milk Sauce. Kiri Hodi 661
0
Coconut Sambol. Pol Sambola 662
0
Cold Almond Soup. Ajo Blanco 578
0
Cold Asparagus with a Chinese Dressing. Liang Ban Hsu Sun 134
0
Cold Asparagus with a Korean Dressing 135
0
Cold Avocado and Buttermilk Soup 579
0
Cold Bean Curd Salad. Liang Ban Dofu 99
0
Cold Buckwheat Noodles. Zaru Soba 330
0
Cold Eggplants with a Soy Sauce Dressing 180
0
Cold Eggplants with Spicy Chinese Peanut Dressing 181
0
Cold Pomegranate Soup. Anar Ka Ras 580
0
Cold Wakame Seaweed Soup. Me Yuk Muchim 580
0
Cold Yogurt Soup in the South Indian Style 582
0
Cold Yogurt Soup with Chickpeas and Celery 581
0
Collard Greens with Asafetida. Haak 220
0
Collard Greens with Browned Onions. Karam Ka Saag 219
0
Cooked Tomato Salsa. Salsa de Jitomate 683
0
Cooling Cucumber and Mint “Drink” 643
0
Corn Bread with Sesame Seeds 356
0
Corn Cooked in Yogurt. Dahi Valu Makai Nu Shaak 172
0
Corn Tortillas 348
0
Corn Tortillas Stuffed with Cheese and Refried Beans. Papoosa de Queso con Frijoles Refritos 351
0
Corn Tortillas Stuffed with Cheese. Papoosa de Queso 350
0
Corn Tortillas Stuffed with Potatoes and Green Pepper. Papoosa de Papa 351
0
Corn with Cauliflower. Phulawar Makai Nu Shaak 173
0
Corn with Ginger 171
0
Cornmeal and Okra Mold. Coo-Coo 336
0
Costa Rican Black Bean Soup. Sopa Negra 595
0
Creamed Eggplant. Baba Ghanouj 183
0
Creamy Sweet “Green Pea” Soup. Leu Dou Hu 611
0
Crisp Potato Cake with Herbs 276
0
Crisp Zucchini Fritters. Kolokithi Tiganito 298
0
Crisply Fried Onions or Shallots in the Persian Style. Pyaz Doug 666
0
Crisply Fried Tortillas. Tostadas 354
0
Crispy, Spicy Slices of Homemade Indian Cheese. Tala Panir 571
0
Crumbled Potatoes with Peas. Aloo Matar 280
0
Crunchy Sichuan Garlic Relish. La Jiao Chiang 664
0
Curried Bean Curd Vegeburgers 104
0
Curried Long Beans. Curry Bodi 210
0
Curried Miso Soup with Pumpkin 607
0
Curried Red Cabbage with Cranberry Juice 151
0
Curried Red Lentil Soup. Masoor Dal Soup 599
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Cypriot Chickpea Stew with Spinach. Revithia Yakhni 31
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Cypriot Lima Bean Stew. Fassoulia Yakhni 56
0
Daikon Pickle. Bai Lowa Baw Liang Tsai 688
0
Deep-Fried Eggplant Slices. Baigan Kachri 192
0
Deep-Fried Eggplants with a Soy Sauce Dressing 180
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Delhi-Style Cilantro and Mint Chutney. Hari Chutney 660
0
Delhi-Style Peach Chutney 700
0
Delicate Stir-Fry of Soft Cheese Curds and Vegetables 567
0
Delicious “Risotto” of Rice and Split Peas. Khichri 400
0
Doubles 458
0
Dried Mushroom Stock 577
0
Ecuador-Style Corn Muffins 356
0
Egg Curry, Goan Style. Unday Ki Kari 518
0
Egg Whites with Peas. Ching Do Chow Tan Bai 530
0
Eggplant and Tomato “Choka” 186
0
Eggplant with Minty Tomato Sauce and Yogurt. Badenjan Boorani 193
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Eggplants and Shiitake Mushrooms Cooked in a Japanese Sauce 187
0
Eggplants with Spicy Shallot-Tomato Sauce. Sambal Terong 190
0
Eggs in a Mulligatawny Sauce 519
0
Emerald Fried Rice. Fay Chway Chow Fan 391
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Escalivada (Salad of Broiled and Roasted Vegetables) 311
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Ethiopian Aromatic Butter. Esme 658
0
Ethiopian Hot Sauce. Awaze 674
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Ethiopian Lentil Salad with Crushed Mustard Seeds. Azefa 629
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Everyday Moroccan Bread. Pan de Morocco 460
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Fava Bean Puree. Bissara 45
0
Fennel and Orange Salad 623
0
Fettuccine (or Tagliatelle) with Ricotta, Spinach, and Pine Nuts. Fettuccine con Ricotta e Spinaci 483
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Fettuccine with a Mushroom Ragout. Fettuccine con Funghi 484
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Figs with Mustard Seeds and Curry Leaves 623
0
Fireman’s Soup 608
0
Flaky Flatbreads Stuffed with Cauliflower. Gobi Ka Paratha 439
0
Flaky Potato Flatbreads. Aloo Ka Paratha 441
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Flat Indian Corn Breads. Makki di Roti 354
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French Omelet with Herbs. Omelette aux Fines Herbes 532
0
French Omelet. Omelette 531
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French Omelet: Filled with Asparagus 532
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French Omelet: Filled with Cheese and Chives 532
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Fresh Fava Beans Sautéed with Garlic and Thyme 199
0
Fresh Ginger and Green Chile Relish 665
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Fresh Herbs with Bread. Sabzi Khordan Ba Naan 627
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Fresh Lime and Ginger Syrup. Neebu Aur Adrak Ka Sharbat 647
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Fresh Lime Syrup. Sherbet-E-Ablimu 647
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Fried Artichokes. Carciofi Fritti 132
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Fried Okra with Fresh Curry or Basil Leaves. Tali Bhindi 252
0
Fried Okra with Onions. Tali Hui Bhindi 254
0
Fried Polenta Slices 343
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Fried Spiced Tempeh. Tempeh Goreng 107
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Frittata with Swiss Chard. Frittata de Beitole 540
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Fritters Made with Hulled and Split Mung Beans. Moong Dal Bhajjia 81
0
Fry Bake or Float 456
0
Ginger Fruit Punch. Phal Ras 645
0
Ginger-Garlic Bean Curd 97
0
Granola 362
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Grated Beets with Shallots 139
0
Greek Eggplant Salad. Melitzanosalata 621
0
Greek Mixed Greens. Horta 233
0
Greek Pumpkin Risotto Made in a Pressure Cooker 410
0
Greek Semolina Pancakes. Simigdali Crepa 471
0
Greek-Style Lentil Salad 630
0
Green Bean and Potato Curry. Bonchi Curry 208
0
Green Bean Salad. Taze Fassoulia Salata 203
0
Green Beans with Browned Shallots 206
0
Green Beans with Cumin and Fennel 202
0
Green Beans with Garlic and Preserved Lemon 205
0
Green Beans with Mushrooms. Sem Aur Khumbi 206
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Green Beans with Roasted Red Pepper and Preserved Lemon 205
0
Green Lettuce with a Korean Dressing 631
0
Green Peas with Coconut and Cilantro. Vatana Bhaji 259
0
Green Pepper and Cucumber Salad 632
0
Green Posole. Posole Verde 338
0
Green Rice with Stuffed Poblano Chiles. Arroz Verde con Chiles Relleños 393
0
Green Salad with a Bean Curd “Mayonnaise” 631
0
Green Tomatillo Salsa. Salsa Verde 679
0
Green Turnip Salad. Lieu Lowa Baw Liang Tsai 638
0
Grilled Sweet Corn 171
0
Grits with Mushrooms 337
0
Guacamole. Salad of Avocado and Tomatillos 613
0
Gujarati Cucumber “Raita”. Kheera Raita 550
0
Gujarati-Style Hot Sweet-and-Sour Potatoes. Khatta-Mittha Batata 273
0
Hard-Boiled Eggs in a Tomato-Cream Sauce 517
0
Homemade Indian Cheese Cooked in the Style of Scrambled Eggs. Paneer Ki Bhurji 569
0
Homemade Indian Cheese Flavored with Black Pepper, Roasted Cumin Seeds, and Roasted Ajwain Seeds 563
0
Homemade Indian Cheese Flavored with Rosemary, Thyme, and Oregano 563
0

Publishers Information

About Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian

Publisher Web Link: http://www.randomhouse.com/crown/clarksonpotter/index.php

In her most comprehensive volume yet, Madhur Jaffrey draws on more than four decades of culinary adventures, travels, and experimentation for a diverse collection that both intrigues and delights the palate. Dishes from five continents touch on virtually all the world’s best loved flavors, for a unsurpassed selection of vegetarian fare.

More than 650 recipes exemplify Madhur’s unsurpassed ability to create simple, flavorful homecooking that is well within the reach of every cook. Extensive sections on Beans, Vegetables, Grains, and Dairy explore the myriad ways these staples are enjoyed worldwide. Each section opens with a detailed introduction; Madhur describes methods for preparation and storage, as well as different cooking techniques and their cultural origins. Throughout she balances appealing, uncomplicated dishes such as sumptuous omelets and rich polentas with less familiar ingredients such as green mangoes, pigeon peas, and spelt. Madhur demystifies the latter with clear-cut explanations so that incorporating new combinations and interesting flavors into everyday cooking becomes second nature. She also offers substantial sections on Soups, Salads, and Drinks, as well as Sauces and Other Flavorings, to help round out a meatless meal and add exciting new flavors to even the most easily prepared dishes. Finally, a complete glossary of ingredients and techniques clarifies some of the little-known elements of the world’s cuisines so that even the uninitiated can bring the flavors of Asia, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and more to their tables.

Throughout this extensive collection, Madhur includes personal anecdotes and historical contexts that bring her recipes to life, whether she’s remembering field of leeks she saw in the mountains of northern Greece or describing how corn-based dishes arrived in Indonesia through colonial trade. Committed vegetarians will rejoice at the wide variety of meatless fare she offers, and nonvegetarians will enjoy experimenting with Madhur’s global flavorings. This highly readable resource promises to be a valuable addition to any cook’s library, helping everyone make healthful ethnic foods a part of everyday cooking. (http://www.randomhouse.com/)

Author Information

About Madhur Jaffrey

Author Web Link: http://www.madhur-jaffrey.com/

Madhur Jaffrey’s career as an author and chef

Miss Jaffrey is the author of An Invitation to Indian Cooking (Alfred A. Knopf, 1973, Vintage in U.S.A., Jonathan Cape and Penguin in the U.K.) which Craig Claiborne of the New York Times described as “one of the finest, most lucid and comprehensive books on Indian cooking ever published.” It remains in print today.

Her next cookbook, Madhur Jaffrey’s World-of-the-East Vegetarian Cooking (Alfred A. Knopf, Jonathan Cape), was published in America in 1981. Mimi Sheraton of the New York Times immediately put it on her Christmas list of the six best cookbooks of the year. Moira Hodgson, also of the New York Times, chose it as a selection for her Kitchen Library column, calling it a “highly original, enticing cookbook.” Miss Jaffrey’s vegetarian book went on to win an R.T. French Tastemakers Award for 1981. Craig Claiborne, in his book, “A Feast Made for Laughter”, said, “If, through some miracle, I decided to resort to a vegetable diet forever, this new book by Madhur Jaffrey, who is to my mind the finest authority on Indian cooking in America, would be my Bible. It is by far the most comprehensive, fascinating and inspired book on vegetable cookery that I have encountered. Whether you are a vegetarian or not, it is a valuable work offering an incredible number of good recipes to appeal to any cook.” This same vegetarian book, which remains in print, was published in the United Kingdom under the title, Eastern Vegetarian Cooking in 1983.

Miss Jaffrey taped an eight-part cookery series for BBC Television in England. The half-hour segments, entitled Madhur Jaffrey’s Indian Cookery, were aired nationally in the United Kingdom starting in September, 1982. The series has been repeated in the United Kingdom more than five times already. It has proved a phenomenal success. A cookbook, published by the BBC to accompany the series, was on the best-seller list for a record eleven months and continues to sell exceedingly well. The television series has been shown at least twice in the United States, Ireland, most of Western Europe, New Zealand and Australia. In May, 1983, Miss Jaffrey was given the Glenfiddich Award for Best Radio/Television Broadcaster of the Year for 1982. This is the most prestigious food and wine award in the United Kingdom. Miss Jaffrey won it for her television cookery series.

In 1985, Miss Jaffrey published two books. Seasons of Splendour (Michael Joseph/Pavilion in the U.S., Atheneum in the U.S.), a children’s book of mythological tales illustrated by Michael Foreman, was named one of the year’s best children’s books by the New York Times and Newsweek. Barbara Thompson of the New York Times said, “The resonances of this magical and profound book will sing on in the heart and mind long after the hundredth bedtime… Seasons of Splendour simply and playfully reveals to the Western reader the heart and soul of traditional Indian society.”

A Taste of India (Pavilion/Michael Joseph in U.K., Atheneum in U.S.) is a book on the regional foods of India, lavishly illustrated with photographs. It was serialized by the color supplement (magazine section) of London’s Sunday Observer over eight weeks and the hard cover edition went on to become a best seller in the U.K. The Literary Review said, “Miss Jaffrey’s A Taste of India is my pick of the season’s offerings. It is comprehensive in its scope and as evocatively written as Elizabeth David’s French Provincial Cooking.” Harpers and Queen said that the book had “filled a gaping hole in the market for an authoritative look at the specifically regional cuisines of the sub-continent. The sketches of her travels mix straightforward information about crops, climate, the land, and styles of cooking with personal evocation and a full-blooded lyricism that borders on the incantatory. The recipes she gathers on her wanderings are thrilling to read — much more so to eat.”

Miss Jaffrey has been written about repeatedly in national magazines and newspapers around the world with Susan Shapiro of Ms. Magazine saying that the cookbooks she most likes to take to bed with her are those by Miss Jaffrey and Patricia Lynden of Connoisseur magazine calling Miss Jaffrey the herald angel of Indian cookery and Leo Lerman of Gourmet saying that A Taste of India is not only the best Indian cookbook but a unique book about India. Miss Jaffrey has been called the “Julia Child of Indian cookery”, “Scheherazade of the kitchen” and the Readers Digest called her the ” Star of Screen and Cuisine.”

Spring, 1989. Harper and Row published Madhur Jaffrey’s Cookbook, a book of easy East-West menus. An excerpt from the book appeared in the March, 1989 issue of Gourmet Magazine. The cookbook has received superb notices all over the United States. The New York Times Book Review section said, “The season has brought a vigorous crop of cookbooks for reading — and for cooking too. At the top of the list is the impeccable Madhur Jaffrey’s Cookbook … In it Ms. Jaffrey …combines cooking ideas from disparate worlds that (she) knows so well and does it with charm, lucidity and great precision in her recipes.” New York Magazine put it in its Best Bets section with Barbara Costikyan saying that the book has “simple dreamlike drawings and recipes for exotic, worldly dishes like cauliflower with ginger and chili … all so intriguing that you will never do pasta salad again.” Gerald Etter in the Philadelphia Inquirer said, ” What makes (the book) delightful to read and easy to use is the same lucid writing and comprehensive coverage that brought awards to Jaffrey’s other cookbooks.” Food and Wine magazine called the book “one of those rare volumes that are as much fun to read as they are to cook from.”

1989. Miss Jaffrey’s three-year project for the BBC came to fruition: an eight-part TV series, Madhur Jaffrey’s Far Eastern Cookery, shot on location, on the foods of eight countries of the Far East — Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia. A cookbook and video of the same name accompany the series. The Sunday Times magazine serialized the book over three weeks. The book, in its very first week jumped on to the best-seller list. The series has received ecstatic reviews in the U.K. Harper and Row published the book in America late in 1989. The TV series followed on PBS and later on the Food Network. The New York Times selected the series as one of the two best shown that year (1992) on television.

1990. Miss Jaffrey wrote and presented Listening To Volcanoes, a very personal TV documentary on colonialism and its aftermath in the Spice Islands of Indonesia for PBS’s Travels series. This was shown on BBC 1 in the UK and on PBS in the United States in ‘92.

1990. Miss Jaffrey wrote and presented a six part series on the history of food, From Manna to Microwave, on BBC’s Radio 4. The Guardian said, “On Friday mornings, the seductive voice of Madhur Jaffrey can be heard in Manna to Microwave. She is taking a cheery saunter through food and history — also geography, sociology, philosophy, theology, and anything else that strikes her fancy… Miss Jaffrey can stir the gastric juices, thanks partly, no doubt, to her television appearances. And her programmes are like well-constructed, if slightly haphazard meals, full of different tastes and with little items as well as big ones. She talks as happily to ordinary housewives as to eminent professors, pokes as happily into libraries as kitchens.”

At year’s end in 1991, Miss Jaffrey was among ten people– “chefs, teachers and food writers who tune our palates” — honored by New York magazine for changing the way New York eats.

Miss Jaffrey’s 1993 publication, A Taste of the Far East (Clarkson Potter/BBC/Pavilion) went on to win two 1994 James Beard awards — for the Best International Cookbook as well as Cookbook of the Year. In 1993, Miss Jaffrey published Quick and Easy Indian Cookery (BBC) in the U.K. and An Indian Spice Kitchen (Carol Southern Books) in the United States. Her next children’s book, Market Days was published in early 1995.

In 1993 Miss Jaffrey also won the Taraknath Das Award given by Columbia University for her contribution to Indo-American understanding through her work in the fields of acting and cookery.

1994 saw Miss Jaffrey completing a six-part BBC TV series on regional Indian food, Madhur Jaffrey’s Flavours of India. Shot on location in India, it was accompanied by a regional Indian cookbook with the same title. The book and the series came out in early March, 1995. In the United Kingdom, the TV series was rated in the top ten for the six weeks it ran and the book, both hard cover and trade paperback went on the best-seller list immediately.

May 1995 saw Miss Jaffrey inducted into the Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America by the James Beard Foundation.

1996 saw the publication of two more cookbooks in the U.K., The Essential Madhur Jaffrey and Madhur Jaffrey Cooks Curries as well as the launch of a line of sauces and chutneys in supermarkets throughout the U.K.

I997. Miss Jaffrey’s newest Children’s book, Robi Dobi: The Marvellous Adventures of an Indian Elephant (Pavilion in the U.K., Dial in the States.) won a Parents’ Choice” Silver Honor. The New York Times Book review referred to it as “a charming tale remembered from the author’s childhood” whereas the Book Review of the London Times said, “I enjoyed it so much I could not stop….It is a sparkling, imaginative tale.” Miss Jaffrey was also inducted into the World Food Media Awards Hall of Fame in Adelaide, Australia.

1998: Miss Jaffrey just won the Silver Spoon award given by Food Arts magazine for her contribution to popularizing Indian food in America.

1999: Miss Jaffrey given an Award for Excellence by Governor George E. Pataki and the New York State Division for Women in recognition of Women’s History Month for changing America through her work in the fields of cooking and acting.

1999: An Invitation to Indian Cooking, Miss Jaffrey’s first cook book, was reissued in hardcover in April by Ecco Press. It has been in continuous print for 27 years.

1999-2000: Her book, Madhur Jaffrey’s World Vegetarian (Ebury Press), a 650 recipe masterpiece. In the UK, it has won the Food-Writers Guild Cookbook of the Year award. The same book, in a slightly different version, was published by Clarkson Potter in the USA. Publisher’s Weekly named it one the hundred best books published in the USA in 1999. There are only 3 cookbooks on this list. The book was nominated for an IACP (International Association of Culinary Professionals) award. It won the James Beard Award for Best International Cookbook. The Seatle Times, in its review suggested, “You may never need to buy another vegetarian cookbook” and the New York Times headlined its review with, “Recipes too good for vegetarians only.”

2001: Miss Jaffrey appeared in Friends for Dinner, a cookery show for the BBC in the UK and Ready, Steady Cook and Cooking Live for the Food Network in the USA. Miss Jaffrey’s newest books, Step-by Step Cookery, published by Ebury Press in the UK and by Ecco Press (Harper Collins) in the States, are published as is Quick and Easy Cookery, Ebury Press, and Foolproof Indian Cookery, BBC Books.

2002: Miss Jaffrey’s Step-by-Step Cookery won the James Beard award for Best International Cookbook.

2002: Miss Jaffrey wrote Sweet Memories for the New Yorker magazine.

2003: Passage to Pakistan, Miss Jaffrey’s article for Saveur magazine, won the IACP Bert Greene Award for Food Journalism in the Magazine category.

2003: In the Autumn, Miss Jaffrey’s newest book, The Ultimate Curry Bible, was published by Ebury Press in the UK and by Clarkson Potter (with the name, From Curries to Kebabs) in the United States. This year also saw a new edition of Madhur Jaffrey’s Indian Cookery (Barrons and BBC Books), which has been in continuous print since 1982 and has already sold close to a million copies.

2004: From Curries to Kebabs/The Ultimate Curry Bible, won the James Beard award for The Best International Cook Book in the United States and the Food Writers Guild Cookbook of the Year Award in the U.K.

Climbing The Mango Trees, a childhood memoir by Miss Jaffrey, was published by Ebury Press in 2005. The Daily Mail called it “a vivid account of a golden childhood…Powerful stuff…Scrap the history. Forget the battlefields. This is her-story: intelligent, funny, forgiving and subversive.”

You Magazine said, “Memoirs don’t come more mouth-watering than this.” The Financial Times Magazine called it a nourishing and restorative memoir. The Bookseller said it was “…a real treat. It will appeal to the legion of Madhur Jaffrey fans and to armchair cooks everywhere with its evocative story.” The Sunday Times said, “Proust and his Madeleine would be put to shame by Madhur Jaffrey’s ability to describe the exact dishes at an alfresco lunch when she was nine.” Easy Living Magazine said: “With the sparkle of a true storyteller, Madhur Jaffrey leads the reader through her childhood in India with enchanting warmth and grace….Those that like to get their teeth into a good biography will be pleased to receive this.” BBC Good Food Magazine said, “This is an evocative account of Madhur Jaffrey’s childhood in Northern India. She brings to life the story of her large family, set against the drama of the Second World War and the partition of India…. With family recipes, this will enchant anyone with an interest in India or its food.” The Observer said, “This paradise… is infused with Jaffrey’s infectious zest, and the smells and flavours of her childhood. …her grace and joie de vivre make this memoir a pure delight.”

2006: The Paperback of Climbing the Mango Trees was released and called, “enchanting…redolent of spices and the smells of cooking all under the Indian sun” (Daily Express on Climbing the Mango Trees).

Climbing the Mango Trees, has continued to garner great reviews since being published in the US, with People magazine, giving in four stars and calling it, “the sort of account that triggers a longing for a life one never lived.” Kirkus Reviews said, “Readers will lap up this mouthwatering memoir” and the New York Times Review of Books said, “She’s evoking a whole world. Wistful, funny, and tremendously satisfying, Climbing the Mango Trees is a memoir about learning to taste.” O, the Oprah Magazine said, “Secret ancestral recipes (one with dew as an ingredient) and luscious tales of picnics in the Himalayas where children rolled ’sucking mangoes’ between their palms, then squeezed the nectar with the ‘taste of ecstasy’ into their mouths. With such earthly pleasures, heaven can wait.” The Boston Globe called Miss Jaffrey, “a lyrical writer” and Newsweek commended, “A superb example of the happy new trend of food memoirs.” The Christian Science Monitor wrote, “Jaffrey’s voice is warm and intelligent and her love of home, family and good food all ring so true.” The Seattle Times said, “Her story reads like a novel and evokes images worthy of a Merchant-Ivory production. You can practically taste sun warmed mangoes plucked from the tree, the barley-sugar candy that holds a hallowed place in the author’s memory.” Newsday said, “Do not attempt to read (this) mouth-watering, evocative memoir on an empty stomach…a delicious tribute to a deeply rooted, multicultural upbringing.”

In 2006, Miss Jaffrey’s first cookbook, An Invitation to Indian Cooking, was inducted into the James Beard Foundation’s Cookbook Hall of Fame.

2008-9: Miss Jaffrey has been writing regularly for the Financial Times, Weekend Edition.

2010: At Home with Madhur Jaffrey, called Curry Easy in the UK, contains recipes from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

Miss Jaffrey is the food consultant at Dawat restaurant, considered by many food writers such as Gael Green of New York magazine to be the best Indian restaurant in New York City. Mimi Sheraton, in Traveler magazine of January 1990, has listed Dawat restaurant as one of the best 50 restaurants in America saying that the “delicate food of cookbook author and chef Madhur Jaffrey result in what is probably the country’s finest Indian restaurant.”)

Miss Jaffrey has been giving cooking classes privately since 1973. She is also an illustrator. She did all the decorative drawings for her first cookbook. The illustrations for a book entitled Shakti, published in the States by Knopf, won for her an award from the American Institute of Graphic Arts. This award was given to the Fifty Best Designed and Illustrated Books of 1974.

In addition to writing cookbooks, Miss Jaffrey has written scores of articles for magazines and newspapers on subjects as varied as Bhutanese dance, ancient Indian cave paintings, the preserved body of St. Francis Xavier, restaurants in the Soviet Union, and inns in the south of France. The publications she has written for include the New York Times, the London Times, the Sunday Observer (London), Smithsonian, Saturday Review, Gourmet, Vogue, The International Review of Food and Wine, Travel and Leisure, Signature, Ms., House and Garden, House Beautiful, Bon Appetit, Organic Gardening, Art and Antiques, The New Yorker and Saveur.

Miss Jaffrey continues to write for magazines and does regular columns for The Financial Times (of London) on food and travel.

Miss Jaffrey has just been awarded an honorary CBE (Commander of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II for “her services to drama and promotion of appreciation for Indian food and culture.” (http://www.madhur-jaffrey.com/)

Cookbooks by Madhur Jaffrey


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